Project Body Smart | WHAT ABOUT THE KIDNEYS?
8161
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-8161,single-format-standard,ajax_leftright,page_not_loaded,,no_delay

BLOG

WHAT ABOUT THE KIDNEYS?

kidneys

We often get asked what supplements to take for kidney health. Honestly, the best way to support kidney health is to eat a healthy diet that includes plenty of potassium, drink plenty of fluids, and most importantly, avoid high blood pressure and diabetes. If you currently are managing high blood pressure or diabetes, maintaining good control will do more for your kidneys than any particular nutrient or supplement. Here are some facts taken from the National Kidney Foundation. Most of these facts apply everywhere.

Healthy kidneys:
• Regulate the body’s fluid levels
• Filter wastes and toxins from the blood
• Release a hormone that regulates blood pressure
• Activate Vitamin D to maintain healthy bones
• Release the hormone that directs production of red blood cells
• Keep blood minerals in balance (sodium, phosphorus, potassium)

Every 30 minutes, your kidneys filter all the blood in your body, removing waste and excess fluid.

Kidney Disease

• Major risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, family history of kidney failure and being age 60 or older. Additional risk factors include kidney stones, smoking, obesity and cardiovascular disease.
• Those at risk should have simple blood and urine tests to check if their kidneys are working properly.
• Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the United States.
• Men with kidney disease are more likely than women to progress to kidney failure.
• Every day, 13 people die waiting for a kidney.

High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Disease

• High blood pressure is the second leading cause of kidney disease.
• Since high blood pressure usually has no symptoms and can affect anyone at any age, it’s important to have regular blood pressure check-ups.
• Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of people with CKD.
• Individuals with early stages of CKD are more likely to die from heart disease than to reach end stage kidney disease.
More than 35% of all people age 20 or older with diabetes have kidney disease.

1 in 10 Americans will have a kidney stone during his or her lifetime

Kidney cancer is nearly twice as common in men as in women

The average annual number of physician visits for an individual with diagnosed kidney disease is 10.28 — second only to cancer.

https://www.kidney.org/news/newsroom/factsheets/FastFacts

TAGS > , , , , , ,

Post a comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.